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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
in 2009. taliban will be given a seat at table and allowed to open an office in qatar. the taliban must first renounce terrorism. >> bret: we talked about what the troop number will be at the end of 2014. what is the going thinking on that. what about the concern about protecting those troops if the number is very low? >> well, absolutely. what we have confirmed is general john allen, the top commanderrer in afghanistan given the national security team around the president three options. 9,000 option, 6,000 option. and 3,000 option. the president will likely decide on 3,000 to 6,000 troops and that will not give you much option in terms of the training and assisting the afghanistan security forces. they will set up bases to deal with al-qaeda if fringe area along the border. >> bret: we'll follow it. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. thank you. do you think the president should speed up the process of having afghan take control of the security? let me know on twitter. to me at bret baier. the politics, west virginia senator rockefeller will not seek a sixth term. the leader of the congr
now but i would say when i arrived in 2002 in afghanistan, pretty early after the fall of the taliban, the country was devastated physically and traumatized sipsychologically. it was literally a basket case. didn't know which way was up. normal was everything before 1978. people couldn't remember normal. they've made a loving progret o. there are girls in school. it's imperfect but now they're scared because there's a lot to lose now. they had this kchaotic 34 year and they don't want to lose it. it isn't numbers of people but it's a relationship that gives them the confidence that we'll are enough of a partner that if they need our help -- not thousands of troops and no billions of dollars -- >> but some sort of relationship. >> some relationship. >> how do you have that when you have afghan forces killing nato forces and personnel? >> there's a lot of mistrust. >> now we stop going on patrols with these guys. >> for a period they did but in reality, again, if you use the anecdote to prove the whole, sometimes it's not true. the wider story is more complex. you've been there. there's
arrived in 2002 in afghanistan, pretty early after the fall of the taliban, the country was devastated physically. and traumatized psychologically, it was literally a basket case, didn't know what was up. and normal was before 1978, that was 24 years at the time. people couldn't remember normal. they made a lot of progress. there are girls in school. there is progress, greater places. there is progress, it is imperfect. now they're scared. they're scared of 2014 because there is a all riglot to lose n they had chaos for 34 years, and the afghan people don't want to lose it. i think what the afghan people want from the u.s. and the west is strategic partnership, not numbers but a relationship that gives them a confidence that we are enough of a partner that if they need our help, not thousands of troops, maybe not even billions of dollars. >> but some sort of presence. >> some sort of presence and some sort of relationship. >> but how do you have that relationship when you have afghan soldiers and police killing u.s. nato forces and utilize personnel, there is a huge amount of distrust,
in the head by taliban gunmen, malala yousafzai walked out of a london hospital, a big step forward on the road to recovery. and just ahead, we'll tell you what's next in her treatment and also how authorities plan to protect her from the taliban moving forward. she was shot in the head, the bullet grazed her brain. she's become an international symbol of courage. her crusade for girls' education is what made her a target of the taliban. but she's never backed down from their threats. in the next month, they're going to replace a section of her scattered skull. amazing how far she's come, and matthew chance joins me now. i think you would agree, it's pretty remarkable to look at those images. do we know what malala and her family are planning to do now? are they planning to stay in britain, at least for the foreseeable future? >> it is amazing. nobody thought she would be able to get up so quickly from the terrible injuries she sustained. it's interesting, that question, because over the past couple of days, the pakistan government has announced it's given a job to malala yousafzai'
the fall of the taliban the country was devastated physically and traumatized psychologically. it was a basket case. and normal was everything before 1978. that was 23 years at the time and now it is 34. people couldn't remember normal. they have made a lot of progress. there are girls in school. it is imperfect and now they are scared of 2014 because there is a lot to lose now and they had this chaotic 34 years and the afghan people don't want to lose it. i think instead of just troop numbers what the afghan people want is a partnership which is a relationship that gives them the confidence that we are enough of a partner that if they need our help, not thousands of troops not even billions of dollars but some sort of presence and relationship. >> how do you have that relationship when you have afghan soldiers and police killing nato forces and u.s. personal? i mean there is a huge amount of distress probably more than there has ever been. >> we have to work through that. >> our whole program is building up afghan security forces and yet now we stop going on patrol with these
, it is not possible to reconcile without the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution and recognizing that if there are changes that they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that and that you can't resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that about every country in the world. and so, you know, we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution, protection of minorities, its protection of women and we think that a failure to provide that protection, not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also, would make afghan -- afghanistan's long-term development impossible to achieve. you know? the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treat its women? does it educate that half of the population? does it give them
be an option that would probably lead to an afghan government under pressure from taliban, perhaps, al qaeda. you know the world in a vacuum i think that would start to leave a vacuum by the government to be filled by taliban for sure and result in afghanistan that is found before the turn of the century. >> you would recommend against it? >> if i were still in office yes, i would. i think there's potential in afghanistan to make the place a lot more secure with the afghan forces but it will take more time than we have currently. >> why do you think the white house may see it differently? >> i think part of it is there's always a tension between getting afghans to take responsibility for their own actions, and making sure they're doing all they can and not overly relying on u.s. and allied forces. i think part of what we're seeing is playing out probably in the media here is to put some pressure on the karzai government to be realistic about their expectations and make sure afghans are doing all they can to ensure their own security. >> what might come out of the karzai
, for the pakistani teenager shot in the head by taliban gunmen, malala walked out of a london hospital, a big step forward on the road to recovery. and just ahead, we'll tell you what's next in her treatment and also how authorities plan to protect her from the taliban moving forward. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. to divvy up this shared d
priorities backwards. if taliban takes control again in afghanistan, we won't have to worry about protecting drone bases or diplomats because we won't be there at all. and i think this is part of the unreality of the obama administration's approach there. the low troop numbers that they're contemplating, that they will be discussing with president karzai will not be any where near sufficient to accomplish our strategic objective, america's strategic objective which is defeating the taliban. and i think we're --. bill: it is fascinating. i apologize for the interruption how the events in benghazi are now shaping our foreign policy whether this administration wants to admit it or not. >> well that perhaps is the small glimmer of good news that they recognize that benghazi was a real debacle for our security policies for embassies overseas but the larger question here in afghanistan is the administration's unwillingness to do what we need to do to prevent 10 years of sacrifice and loss of life by our forces from simply being wasted if the taliban come back into power. bill: well this administra
immaturity of afghan forces alongside the continuing presence of the taliban, isn't it in our interest to walk slowly out of this conflict rather than too quickly? >> well, it may be in our national security interest to do that, martin, but there's been a great deal of anticipation that this conflict was coming to an end. we saw during the presidential campaign that they d republicans tried to make a big deal of squabbling over the details but they, too, were seeing a fairly rapid end to this, and this expedites it somewhat more quickly. so i think there's going to be a lot of crossing of fingers and hoping things don't turn into an even worse disaster there. but this had already been baked in the cake. there's no political will to stay any further. >> okay. mike, i followed much of what you have written on the subject of afghanistan, and it seems as though you feel a little more optimistic about the country. but given the endemic corruption, the harboring of pakistani terrorists along the border, the confused way that nato has pumped money into afghanistan, do we leave a nation that r
with the taliban? that could actually produce a formal end to the war, our departure really can't. jenna: if you would, michael, because the last time you were in afghanistan i remember reading some of your notes from that trip. you said at that time you said the taliban are not winning now, but that that could change, and so when we're looking at a war and finishing it and who won and who lost if the taliban are negotiated with is that a win for us? is it a win for the american people and our security? >> i think our core security goal is to make sure that the government in afghanistan is in control of its own territory to the point where terrorists sanctuaries cannot spring up again. that is the core american national security goal. we'd like to be able to also keep an eye on pakistan's western provincess from that area as well and continue some of the operations that as you know we've been conducting from afghanistan to go after terrorists there too. those are our core interests. everything else is in the category of nice to v. unfortunately you can't necessarily go after a terrorist unless y
. and the taliban issued a statement saying if u.s. troops are left here they vow and promise more war and destruction. >> thanks to you. be safe, as well. the numbers being floated in terms of how many troops the u.s. might leave in afghanistan have ranged as high as 20,000. they are as low as 3,000. let's get to the war room. former chief of staff for west virginia. a republican strategist and former aid to president george h.w. bush. what do you think that we will hear from this meeting between president obama and president karzai. >> president obama i'm sure will listen to the laundry list of complaints that president karzai has. i think both are concerned about the local audience, that is to say the domestic audience. president karzai is concerned about the audience at home and president obama has to consider the bigger picture. >> chris, with the political reality is that the public wants out of afghanistan. and the political reality in afghanistan is that they want u.s. troops to leave, why, then, keep any troops in afghanistan? >> that is a really good question. i think you are
that would be under pressure from taliban, perhaps al qaeda. you know, the world, of course, is a vacuum. i think that would start to leave a vacuum and a vulnerability to the afghan government that would be filled by taliban for sure and could result in an afghanistan that we found before the turn of this century. >> so you would recommend against it. >> if i were still in office, yes, i would. i think there's potential there in afghanistan to make the place a lot more secure with afghan forces, but it's going to take more time than we have currently. >> why do you think the white house may see it differently? >> i think part of it is there's always tension between getting afghans to take responsibility for their own actions and making sure they're doing all they can and not overly relying on u.s. and allied forces. so i think part of what we're seeing is playing out probably in the media here is to put some pressure on the karzai government to be realistic about their expectations and make sure that the afghans are doing all they can to ensure their own security. >> what might come out of
at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the cia has started off 2013 by using drones to bomb taliban targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> the
on a billiards hall in southwest pakistan. a sunni militant group with ties to the pakistani taliban is claiming responsibility for the bombings. >>> new this morning, an apparent hostage situation inside a los angeles mall that's still going on. l.a. police say two armed men somehow got into a mall at lax about two hours after closing last night. they believe they may be holding a woman hostage inside a nordstrom rack store. overnight workers were evacuated there. the situation closed part of the 405 freeway for a time. it's reopened. >>> during a week of talks aimed at ending gun violence, gunfire rings out at another school. a student shot one classmate and tried to shoot another in taft, california. police say the boy had been targeted students who bullied him. a teacher prevented more bloodshed by talking the student into putting the gun down. the injured student is in critical but stable condition. >> today's gun control talks will focus on the video game industry. the entertainment software association which represents several major video game makers has confirmed it will attend. vice pre
negotiating power with the taliban. >> the position we take in showing that we are going to continue to complete this mission, the better the chances we have to ultimately achieve political reconciliation. >> the pentagon was only the beginning of the afghan president's visit to washington. >> our meeting, i believe, helped -- will help lay the ground work for president karzai's discussions tomorrow with president obama. >> sources say president karzai and his defense minister brought a wish list to the pentagon, drones, helicopters, and hardware to support their security forces. >> what we talked about yesterday was, you know, let's move beyond a wish list of equipment. >> the u.s. want assurances the terrorists won't set up troops in afghanistan after the troops leave. karzai agreed. >> be able to provide security to these people. >> but a recent pentagon reports that the afghan border patrol relies on the u.s. for even its most basic needs, food and water. it's rife with illiteracy, lack of accountability, and corruption. and these conditions are expected to endure beyond 2014. bu
of the soldiers and taliban, they are ready for a withdrawal because they feel if the withdrawal happens, there will be less fighting. but many analysts say the fighting will continue. >> on a side note, real interesting, before we let you go, we don't get much face time with atia, we were talking about movies coming to afghanistan, zero dark thirty, whether it was seen there yet. girls going back to school. here in america we think all children need to be educated. women can't go to the movie theater in afghanistan. >> no, they can't. if they try to it would be a dangerous prospect. the men that go to the movie theaters, we have to remember afghanistan doesn't have a class that have jobs, many boys are going there and causing troubles. girls cannot go and bear by go out by themselves without being harassed. massive sexual harass. me ment on the streets. there are children providing for their families and treated pretty badly. >> we need to continue talking about this. thanks for being here. great to see you. as we mentioned president obama and president karzai will hold a joint news con
for afghan women as the taliban returns. i find that a very scary report. >> the other people scared are the pakistanis. >> right. >> looking at what's happening says kroog the border, if we are completely pulling out. what does it say about the surge and the american lives that were lost with that escalation? >> if you look at the pentagon's own most recent report on what's been the last six months in afghanistan, you will -- of the most recent -- the most repeat report from the pentagon on previous six months in afghanist afghanistan, you will see that the levels of violence that have returned to -- are now greater than presurge levels. this obviously brings us to the conclusion that the surge has made no difference. now, the military will disagree with that, and i would say the surge has made a difference in parts of afghanistan, in southern afghanistan, and helmand province especially where 20,000 marines were there. they're leaving soon. it did make a difference to some degree in kandahar, so i think the zero option is partly strategic. it was partly to negotiate with karzai to
our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and afghans are more security and insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or are on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country everyday. we still face significant challenges, but because of this progress, our transition is on track. at the nato summit last year wing a e greed with the coalition forces that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid-2013. president karzai and the team have been here for several days, and we have shared a vision of how to move ahead and consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today, with we agreed as afghan forces take the lead, and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a sup
back into a civil wary will it fall back to the taliban? and does that mean al qaeda is coming back. president karzai knows that he needs america's help right now. but he's also trying to let america know that he means business when it comes to securing his own land and having complete sovereignty from american rule and military. >> it just shows you how dmrik indicate the whole equation is. atiyyah, good to see you here. one crucial voice on afghanistan will be chuck hagel if confirmed as secretary of defense. president obama nominated him earlier this week now the white house is gearing up for a nomination fight. cleaning me is roger simon from politico. good morning. >> good morning. your new piece is titled "hagel puts country ahead of conquest." where do you see us if indeed chuck hagel is confirm as defense secretary? >> i see us heading out. hagel has wanted our forces out of afghanistan for a while now. we have accomplished our purpose there. we have met our goals. we have dispersed al qaeda, and destroyed much of our leadership. andal we're doing now is propping up a regime
back the taliban. but it was always clear that at some point, you know, whether it's 2014 or '15 or '16 that military's going to have to get smaller because the afghan government cannot afford to sustain it and other countries will not put enough money into afghanistan to keep numbers at that size. >> good to see you, chris lawrence. >>> a face-off erupting in china over freedom of the press. this is all happening in a place called guangzhou, a little more than 80 miles from hong kong. in a rare protest, chinese rallied outside the offices of the southern weekly newspaper. they were supporting the journalists who say that the government rewrote an editorial calling for politic real form and gave it a positive spin. a very positive spin. howard kurtz host of "reliable sources" and the washington bureau chief of "newsweek" and "the daily beast." a lot of people surprised that they wouldn't be censorship of something like this. this newspaper's had a bit of rope in the past to play with. why does this incident be a flash point? >> certainly has seemed to touch a nev, michael. the idea of a
to be a resurgence and outbreak of violence in a place that's already plagued by it. the taliban this weekend vowed more of what it called war destruction if the u.s. leaves behind a residual force. that's a sobering reminder of the instability here, alex. >> i appreciate the breakdown of the numbers and what they would be doing. >>> the new headline this morning, the white house considering a broad gun control plan. i'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain relieve
around in afghanistan when they were hunting the taliban. >> right. >> will you just give us an insight on the problems that we face getting rid of, you know, these magazine clips where you can, you know, shoot off, you know, dozens of bullets in seconds? and some of these assault weapons that, again, are made for one reason and one reason only, to kill as many human beings as quickly as possible. talk about the challenges. because i know there are 40 democrats in the house that are going to fight getting rid of assault weapons. of course, most of the republicans are going to fight it. what's the great challenge there? >> i think that you're right, joe, and general mcchrystal was right, these are weapons of war. they are not weapons that you go hunting with or really that you can protect yourself with. you know, there is going to be a discussion. you know, starting today, we're going to hear it from governor cuomo. the vice president's having a series of meetings today. he's going to come out with a series of proposals very soon. assault weapons will most likely be part of that. we had
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)